NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star, at the New Museum on Bowery 

SSPNY Heads Over to Nolita's New Museum on Bowery for NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star

SSPNY checks out the New Museum right now as they hold a giant time-capsule of a show called NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star. The proper exhibition is on display in every available space inside the New Museum gallery from the lobby to a soaring room on third floor, where rude skateboard decks, stickers, and Daniel Joseph Martinez's Museum Tags hang. Here an Untitled work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres features a string of light bulbs, and deep orange carpeting, a billboard of a lone bird flying through a grey sky with a haunting soundtrack playing in the background.

For culture lovers who enjoy a little edge in their art, downtown New York City is definitely the place to be. Take the pretty, intimate neighborhood of Nolita, for example, where Stone Street Properties has recently added a lovely, historic building right on Elizabeth. True, that part of town is probably better known for its great boutique shopping and casual, happening restaurants, but in the past decade or so Nolita has been the site of an art-scene explosion, with a dozen terrific new little galleries, all anchored by the world-class contemporary art exhibition and event space, the great New Museum. Although the New Museum, the institution, has been around since 1977, the current site (on Bowery across from Prince) and striking building (designed by Tokyo-based Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA) only opened about five years ago, in December of 2007, and has quickly become a cultural hub for the community. And, as it happens, right now at the New Museum there's an amazing, giant-time-capsule of a show, NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star.

SSPNY checks out all five floors of the New Museum's gallery, named after a Sonic Youth album, and even spills over into the annex next door Studio 231, which now holds an installation by Nari's Ward called Amazing Grace that consists of dozens of discarded and filthy baby strollers strapped together fire hoses and assembled into the shape of a ship with Mahalla Jackson's version of Amazing Grace playing in the background.

Named after the influential Sonic Youth album recorded that year (though released in May of 1994), NYC 1993 fills all five floors-worth of the New Museum's galleries, and even spills over into the annex next door, Studio 231. In fact, the installation that takes over Studio 231 may be my favorite piece in the whole exhibition, Nari Ward's jaw-dropping Amazing Grace, which consists of dozens of discarded, often-filthy baby strollers, strapped together by old lengths of fire hose and assembled into the shape of ship, Mahalia Jackson's rendition of the classic spiritual of the same name playing softly in the background. It's an extraordinary work, designed to be discomfiting, and succeeded brilliantly.

SSPNY even checks out Jessica Diamond's massive Tributes to Kusama: Infinity billboard, as well as other disturbing works of art such as Pepon Osario's crime scene installation, Nayland Blake's amusingly titled Equipment for a Shameful Epic, and more.

Inside the New Museum proper the NYC 1993 exhibition takes over every available gallery, from the lobby space (love the rude skateboard decks, there, and the stickers, and Daniel Joseph Martinez's Museum Tags); to the soaring room on three, which houses my OTHER favorite piece in the show, an as-usual Untitled work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres featuring a string of light bulbs, deep orange carpeting, "billboards" of a lone bird flying through a grim sky, and a haunting, repetitive soundtrack; to the small nook off the stairwell between floors three and two. There are lots of big names here at NYC 1993, and plenty of familiar, iconic pieces, including Charles Ray (his creepy Family Romance), Lorna Simpson, Paul McCarthy (his even more creepy Cultural Gothic), David Hammons, John Currin (a pair from his Girl in Bed series, below) and Matthew Barney. There are also lots of things that I had never seen before, such as Pepon Osario's elaborate and disturbing crime scene installation, Nayland Blake's amusingly titled Equipment for a Shameful Epic, and Jessica Diamond's massive Tributes to Kusama: Infinity (above).

SSPNY also checks out the iconic works of John Currin from his Girl in Bed series, and other creepy Cultural Gothic works from acclaimed artists such as Charles Ray, Lorna Simpson, and Paul McCarthy. The New Museum is located on Bowery between Rivington and Stanton Streets open from Wednesday through Sunday and free on Thursdays!

NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star will be at the New Museum May 26. The New Museum is located on Bowery between Rivington and Stanton Streets, and is open from Wednesday through Sunday at 11:00 a.m., and until 6:00 p.m. each of those days except Thursday, when it's open until 9:00 p.m. The New Museum is free on Thursdays from 7:00 until 9:00. Lots more info about the New Museum and the NYC 1993 show, here.

SSPNY has recently added a new building in Nolita right on Elizabeth Street, near great boutique shopping and restaurants, and what has become over the last decade an art-scene explosion with a dozen terrific new little galleries all anchored by the contemporary art exhibition and event space, the great New Museum. Here, Stone Street explores the New Museum, an institution since 1977, whose new location opened in December 2007 on Bowery across from Prince Street, in a striking building designed by Tokyo-based Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, which has quickly been named a cultural hub for the community.

 

written on 04/10/2013

Posted in: Nolita


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