SSPNY featured on TheRealDeal.com  

"Here’s what the $10M-$20M NYC investment sales market looked like last week"

Check out today's article on The Real Deal featuring Stone Street Properties.  

"Jeffrey Kaye’s Stone Street Properties purchased an 18-unit residential building at 350 West 18th Street in Chelsea for $10 million. The six-story walk-up, between Seventh and Eighth avenues, is a rental building with nearly 9,900 square feet of space. The seller, Richard Sachs, paid $5.5 million for the building in 2006. Stone Street Properties also recently acquired a six-story residential building at 1413 York Avenue for $7 million."

We are very excited to add 350 West 18th Street and 1413 York Avenue to our current portfolio. 

See more at:

http://therealdeal.com/blog/2015/06/02/heres-what-the-10m-20m-nyc-investment-sales-market-looked-like-last-week-24/

Does Andrew Carmellini's Glittering "Grand Cafe" Lafayette Live Up to the Hype? 

SSPNY Hangs Out at the Glittering "Grand Cafe" at Andrew Carmellini's Lafayette to See if the Food Lives Up to the Hype. And it Does!

SSPNY tries out the new, much hyped Andrew Carmellini's Lafayette restaurant in NoHo for a taste of excellent food, a lively, good-looking crowd, and a marvelous time at this instant success, which is the third restaurant Carmellini's opened, after The Dutch in SoHo, and Locanda Verde in Tribeca.

It's not really a surprise that Andrew Carmellini's Lafayette landed in NoHo last month with an explosion of excitement and hype. After all, Carmellini's previous restaurants, including The Dutch in SoHo, and Locanda Verde in Tribeca, are among the most popular, consistently celeb-studded spots in town. They also happen to be quite excellent, food-wise. But although Lafayette was a guaranteed instant success--and it has been, packed and lively every night with good-looking folks having a marvelous time--I was wondering if the food was good enough, and the scene genuine and convivial enough, to be considered a neighborhood spot for SSPNY Nolita residents.    

 SSPNY had a terrific supper at Lafayette with a huge list of things to try on their appealing menu, starting with a hefty hillock of chewy and bright Spring Lentils, with chunks of tender tongue and infused with the Indian-food-spice vadouvan for only $8.

The answer, in a word: absolutely. Lafayette not only delivers on its promise of a glittering night on the town--really, the room here is so pretty, the service so effortlessly friendly, your fellow diners so beautiful and smiley, that you can't help but feel like.... ah, yes, THIS is why I love New York--but it also functions quite well as a local favorite, where generous portions and reasonable prices make it easy (and desireable) to become a regular. And it's open all day, with a comfortable, fully-laden bakery and coffee area up front, and a lunchtime-only Brisket Burger that's been getting raves. Basically? Lafayette is perfect, the type of place every neighborhood wants, but only a few receive.   
 
SSPNY next opts out of the entrees and tries one of Lafayette's half-dozen handmade pastas, ordering the Black Fettuccine, chopped full of squid, lobster, scallops, clams and more, on top of ground chorizo, which tastes like eating a big bowl of summer.
 
I had a terrific supper at Lafayette the other night, and can't wait to return to try more things on Carmellini's lengthy and appealing menu. First up was a hefty hillock of chewy and bright Spring Lentils, studded with chunks of tender, well-seasoned tongue (which went nicely with the mustard sauce) and infused with the Indian-food-ish spice blend, vadouvan. For only $8. I loved this. And if you really want to fill up before your entrees, get Lafayette's Frisee Salad, prepared as you'd expect--bacon, croutons, runny poached egg, lots of vinegar--which is huge and addictive and delicious.   
 
SSPNY had an absolutely epic meal at Lafayette complete with a pretty room, effortlessly friendly service, and fellow smiley and beautiful diners, as well as generous portions, and reasonable prices. Not to mention it's also open all day, and has a full bakery and coffee area in front to make this the absolute perfect neighborhood spot.
 
Already sated, I skipped the entrees proper and opted to try one of Lafayette's half-dozen handmade pastas, and was rewarded with a tremendous Black Fettuccine, heavily populated with all manner of crustaceans and cephalopods--squid, lobster, scallops, clams--as well as enough ground chorizo to have an impact. Redolent of sea, it's like eating a big bowl of summer. But even if you already have dinner plans for next five months or whatever, don't skip the Lafayette bakery. Everything looks amazing here, and I can tell you from personal experience that the rich Butterscotch-Coffee Eclair and the gooey, nut-and-fruit-studded Florentine Cookie live up to their appearances. 

SSPNY also makes sure that you try Lafayette's Grand Cafe bakery where everything looks delicious,  and the Butterscotch-Coffee Eclair and the gooey, nut-and-fruit-studded Florentine Cookie, as pictured here, are both as good as they look!

 
Andrew Carmellini's Lafayette Grand Cafe and Bakery is located on the corner of Lafayette and Great Jones Streets, and is open for breakfast (at the bakery), lunch and dinner, which starts at 5:30. More info and the complete Lafayette menu, here. 
 
SSPNY declares Andrew Carmellini's Lafayette Grand Cafe and Bakery to be a perfect neighborhood spot for SSPNY Nolita residents, located on the corner of Lafayette and Great Jones Streets, now open for [bakery] breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Uncle Boons: A Fun, Friendly Neighborhood Place Serving up Traditional Thai Delights 

SSPNY Heads to Nolita for a Taste of Uncle Boons' Traditional Thai Delights

SSPNY heads over to Nolita to check out Uncle Boon’s authentic thai restaurant Located on 7 Spring Street in NYC for a friendly, cozy, and vintage restaurant that serves up traditional Thai cuisine.

I'm always a bit wary of new, easy-on-the-eyes restaurants in so-called trendy neighborhoods like Nolita. Is it just a money grab, an "all-concept, no-feeling" type of place trying to be the next hot spot for weekend scenesters? Or is there real love in the kitchen, and warmth up front? The very good news for Nolita locals: Uncle Boons, opened in April by Per Se alumns Matt Danzer and Ann Redding, falls firmly into the latter category. This is a convivial, comfortable restaurant, with an amusingly over-the-top design sensibility and some seriously good, traditional-leaning Thai food. 

SSPNY first tries out the Mee Krob : a generously-portioned spicy sweetbread dish in which the offal is perfectly cooked, and where the sawtooth herbs and tamarind sauce added exotica, and the crispy noodles which made the dish great and crunchy. 
 
The subterranean Uncle Boons has a cozy feel to it, with three smallish areas all done up with a million old-school photographs and oddball knickknacks. There's the dim, welcoming bar area right as you climb down the entranceway stairs, where you can get beer, wine, Thai snacks and, now that it's summer so why not, a Singhai Beer Slushie for only seven bucks. There's the front dining room, casually outfitted in brick and wood. And there's the Sanuk Sanuk room in the back, which means "fun" in Thai and definitely lives up to its name. 
 
SSPNY next tries out the Khao Soi Kaa Kai: a borderline-fiery, "northern style golden curry" casserole with egg noodles, meat-falling-off-the-bone chicken legs, pickled mustard greens and coconut milk.
 
The Uncle Boons menu is a little pricier than you're used to in this genre--appetizers and "drinking food" priced in the mid-teens; entrees in the low- to mid-20s--but rest assured, this is skillful, creative cooking, using fresh, interesting ingredients. I tried a couple of dishes the other evening, and will certainly be back for more. My starter, for example, was excellent, a generously-portioned spicy sweetbread dish called Mee Krob in which the offal was cooked perfectly, the sawtooth herbs and tamarind sauce added exotica, and the crispy noodles brought a whole lot of crackle to the party. 
 
SSPNY heads to the back of Uncle Boons, which features the Sanuk Sanuk room that means “fun” in Thai. It is perfect for private parties; outfitted with Thai patterned wood walls, mirrored ceilings and provides views of a lush outdoor garden in the middle of the busy Nolita neighborhood.
 
My main dish at Uncle Boons was just as good, the Khao Soi Kaa Kai, a borderline-fiery, "northern style golden curry" casserole with egg noodles, meat-falling-off-the-bone chicken legs, pickled mustard greens and coconut milk. Great stuff. And the staffers were all friendly and helpful, with no trendy-restaurant attitude in the house. A very pleasant experience all around. Uncle Boons is located on Spring Street between Elizabeth and Bowery, and is open Monday through Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.; on Friday and Saturday until 12:00 midnight, and on Sunday until 10:00. For more info and the complete Uncle Boons menu, click here. 
 
As you enter Uncle Boon’s, you are immediately greeted with a pub that features a 10-seat bar with views of the rotisserie and charcoal grill. This dimly-lit welcoming area consists of exposed brick walls, which are full of framed prints and photographs illuminated by mismatched chandeliers.



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